What happens in your home state when you get an out of state DUI?

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What happens in your home state when you get an out of state DUI?

I live in SC and had a DUI in 2007. I received another one in GA last year and just went to court. I served 4 days in jail, 240 hours community service, a hefty fine, and required to take the ADSAP course in my home state. When this 2nd DUI hits my SC driving record what is SC going to do (suspension, fines, interlock)? I got hit hard by GA.. Is SC going to hit me hard too?

Asked on June 23, 2011 under Criminal Law, South Carolina

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

What has happened to you is not an uncommon event. Many people travel across state lines and then get in to trouble on the "other side."  There is something known as the Interstate Driver's License Compact and if your state belongs then it is most likely that the state in which you were convicted will notify your home state.  Then you will be subject to the penalties there as well, although the "time served" issue may be a plus for you.  In other words, it is possible to have your drivers license suspended regardless of the state you are licensed to drive in. The liklihood is high that this and other penalties will be imposed. I would speak with an attorney in your home state as soon as you can to try and help you with this.


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