What methods, if any, can an employer use to recover funds?

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What methods, if any, can an employer use to recover funds?

My now former employer wants me to sign a letter stating that they will wash out what them claim I owe them in exchange for the 2 weeks of pay they owe

me for being terminated. I refuse to sign this letter because I do not agree with

why I was fired and do not agree that I owe them this money. The letter they send me said, :If you are not in agreement to this arrangement, please contact me and we will issue payment for the 2 weeks notification pay with the required withholdings. We will also withhold any amount legally allowable

without your consent and seek to recover the remainder of the unpaid balance due to the company

Asked on February 21, 2018 under Employment Labor Law, Ohio

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

First, forget out whether you agree about why you were fired: that is irrelevant, unless you had a written employment contract which was violated by your termination. Without a written employment contract protecting or guarantying your employment, you were an employee at will and could be terminated at any time for any reason--even one you disagree with or think is unfair.
They cannot withhold pay from you legally unless you agree to let them do this; if you do not agree and withhold pay anyway, you could sue them for the money.
If they believe that you owe them money for some reason (repayment of tuition; for damage you did or items you lost; for improper personal expensese you charged to the company; for a loan from the company you never repaid; etc.) they have the right to sue you. To win compensation or payment from you in court, they'd have to prove to judge and/or jury that you do owe them the money.


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