What do we do if we inheirted my moms trailer and her estate is still in probate?

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What do we do if we inheirted my moms trailer and her estate is still in probate?

This month it was decided that my husband and I are to have the mobile that she lived in. We are still in the process of sorting through stuff and decided we would move in and gave notice at the place where we were staying. The trailer is in a small park and the landlord informed us today that she needed names, SSN, etc. of all who are living here (no problem). We are in a dilemma because my brother is the executor of the estate, is overseas at the moment and I am trying to reach him. Can the park deny us living here even if we own the mobile? How does this work?

Asked on December 29, 2011 under Real Estate Law, Oregon

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

The problem that I see from what you have written is that even though you stand to inherit your mother's mobile home under her Will, the estate has yet to be closed and legal title to the unit is not in your name at the present time.

I would advise the landlord that you are to end up getting the mobile home in your name when the probate closes. You might provide the landlord with all information concerning the probate that the mobile home is an asset of. If there is an attorney handling this probate, perhaps a call from him or her to the landlord may assist in clearing up any questions concerning getting the lease for the unit formalized.

There is always possibility that the mobile home park can deny you access to live at the place that you are writing about.


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