What to do if someone will not re-issue a lost check on a reasonable amount of time?

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What to do if someone will not re-issue a lost check on a reasonable amount of time?

I paid my college for this quarter ahead of time and in full on the assumption that I would be taking a certain number of credits this quarter. Once my schedule was finalized, it turned out I was taking fewer credits than I’d paid for and I filed for a refund, which was apparently processed almost a month ago, though the check has yet to arrive. When I asked them about voiding it and re-issuing a new one because it is obviously lost in the mail, I was told that they “can’t do that but if the check isn’t cashed in 160 days they will re-issue a new one.” This seems ludicrous. Is it legal?

Asked on February 13, 2012 under General Practice, Colorado

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Different companies and institutions have different customs and practices with respect to the timing of issuing a replacement check when requested when it appears that one has been lost. Your question does not pertain to a legal issue but rather a business practice with respect to your school where there is a 160 day wait until a new check is issued for a lost check.

I would offer to pay for the fee to get a new check issued and the old one cancelled with the bank so that you can get your refund sooner rather than later.


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