Child support and probation/parole

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Child support and probation/parole

my children’ts father is on parole, and has missed his monthly child support payment. Could this cause his parole to be violated?

Asked on June 1, 2009 under Criminal Law, North Carolina

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

I could find nothing specific under North Carolina law.  It would appear that unless child support payments are specifically addressed in the terms of his parole non-payment is not a violation per se.  However, non-payment is a crime - either a misdemeanor, or in extreme cases, a felony.  By committitng even a misdemeanor his parole might well be put in jeopardy.  You will need to consult with an attorney in your area about this.

Also, if you are having trouble getting you child support, there are other measures that can be used to enforce child support payments.  If a non-custodial parent does not pay child support, he or she is subject to enforcement measures in accordance with Federal and North Carolina child support law to collect regular and past-due payments.  These include things such as wage withholding, occupational or professional license(s) revocation, driver’s license revocation, state and federal tax refund intercepts, and liens placed on assets.

For more information I have provided a link to the North Carolina Child Support Enforcement Services: http://www.ncdhhs.gov/dss/cse/geninfo.htm


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