If I am unable to work due to a car accident, does my insurer have to help me pay my rent untilI am able to work again?

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If I am unable to work due to a car accident, does my insurer have to help me pay my rent untilI am able to work again?

My car accident was a little over 3 years ago. I am fully covered by auto owners insurance. About a month ago I had to have a major surgery on my hip due to the accident, because of this I had to move from my house since I am unable to travel up and down stairs. I had to give up my house and now I don’t have a stable place or a handicap accessible home. Also, I cannot now work due to the surgery so I have no income coming in. Does my insurance have to help me with a suitable place to live until I can began to work again?

Asked on September 9, 2011 under Insurance Law, Michigan

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Your insurer needs to pay everything it is obligated to under the policy--not a cent less, but also not a cent more. This means it has to pay both the types of costs covered under your policy (and no other) and also only up to the policy limit, or the maximum amount it is obligated under the policy. There is therefore no general or always true answer to your question: an insurance policy is a contract, and like any other policy, it is governed by its terms. You need to review the policy closely to see what it does and does not cover; in the event of any ambiguities or confusion, or if the insurer will not pay what you believe it is obligated to pay, you should consult with an attorney, who can review the policy with you and, if necessary, challenge the insurer's determination. Good luck.


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