Asked by company owners to spy and intercept communications to be used as evidence for termination of company President. Do I have a case?

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Asked by company owners to spy and intercept communications to be used as evidence for termination of company President. Do I have a case?

As the person overseeing the company’s computer network operation, I was asked by the owners to spy and intercept person’s personal and business electronic communications to collect evidence of ill intent toward the owners. The content discovered through eavesdropping caused severe stress on both my working and personal relationships. Prior to his termination, I was accused by the President of spying and received harsh criticism and questioning. I was asked by owners to lie and continue intercepting comm. Stress caused and impact on my life is beyond my ability to put into words.

Asked on June 3, 2009 under Employment Labor Law, Florida

Answers:

J.M.A., Member in Good Standing of the Connecticut Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

In the united states you can sue for just about anything.  In this case, your claims apears to be that you suffered emotional distress from the company's actions.  Whether you can say this conduct was extreme and outrageous appears to be a question of fact that can be determined by a judge or jury. If you really feel that suing the company and/or the owners is what you want to do, i suggest hiring a lawyer to sue them.  You should gather all the documents you have as proof and bring them to a lawyer that will take your case.  Hopefully, the owners will settle to avoid the exposure/humiliation, but you have to be prepared to go the distance.


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