What if you are caught stealing and are charged with a misdemeanor larceny but you do not remember actually taking the items?

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What if you are caught stealing and are charged with a misdemeanor larceny but you do not remember actually taking the items?

I am 19, still in high school, take advanced placement courses, top 15% of my class, work at animal hospital, work at a restaurant, and I have seen a therapist since I was about 13. However, before this event I had not been able to see her for almost a year for financial reasons. I had to take the items because a secret shopper saw me. I do not remember actually taking the items. I could have paid for the them, because I got paid that day, however, something happened. I saw my therapist 5 days after the occurence and she thinks there is something perhaps medically wrong. What should I do?

Asked on March 27, 2012 under Criminal Law, North Carolina

Answers:

Kevin Bessant / Law Office of Kevin Bessant & Associates

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

First, I would suggest you speak with a criminal defense attorney in this matter to assist you in court. I say this because you state certain factors that can be raised to your advantage in this case such as your mental state at the time these items were allegedly taken or stolen. If you decided to plead guilty to the charges, most courts will allow you to enter a no-contest plea if you believe you stole the items, but can not remember all of the facts surrounding the incident. However, when you say that you could of possibly paid for them, and you can prove that with a receipt for the goods, then why plead guilty or no contest at all? Again, I would seriously consider speaking with a criminal defense attorney before your next court date to further help you.


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