What can I do to stop a co-worker’s harrassment?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What can I do to stop a co-worker’s harrassment?

I work for a large company in a entry level supervisory role. A manager that is 1 level above me, who I have to work with but is not who I directly report to, is monitoring my behavior.  He is discussing reasons why I am ineffective with VP’s and my supervisor has told me that she is concerned for my career because of his actions. All of what he is saying is inaccurate. 2 VP’s have stated that the information they are receiving is contradictory to other feedback and my past performance. This has been 2.5 years, through 2 supervisors. I asked for help with no resolve. I need this to stop. Do I have legal recourse?

Asked on January 31, 2011 under Employment Labor Law, Wisconsin

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

IF you have reason to believe that the harassment is prompted by or due to your membership in a specifically protected group or category--e.g. your race, sex, religion, age (over 40), or disability status--then you may have a legal cause of action or recourse. However, if it's just that your coworker doesn't like you or feels it would be to her advantage to get rid of you  or damage your career, there is not law against that: coworkers can be nasty, underhanded, deceitful, etc.

IF the person is making false factual--emphasis on "factual"--assertions or statements about you to others, that may give rise toa  cause of action for defamation. However, opinions are not actionable, and the mere fact that her information is contradictory to others' information does not itself make it false or defamatory. It must be something is factually untrue to possibly be defamation.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption