Wages not paid

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Wages not paid

I had a part time job last year 3 days a week working in a Greek American
School in Whitestone. The agreement was to get paid a total of 18,000.00 with 24
pay stubs at 750.00 each. That would be for every two weeks. I only received
14,550.00 and that was done with direct deposit. They still owe me 3,450.00.
I’ve contacted the Principal numerous times and he keeps on telling me that I
will get that money. Three teachers took him to court and they won. He owed them
5,000.00 each. I do have an email he send me agreeing to pay me, however he
wasn’t sure if it would be for one lump sum or that I would get it in smaller
installments over the summer. But so far I have received NOTHING. I had a verbal
handshake agreement not a written contract. He also tried to intimidate me, by
saying if I pursue this in a court of law I would loose, because I don’t have the
proper paper work written contract. What should I do?

Asked on May 17, 2018 under Employment Labor Law, New York

Answers:

S.L,. Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

You can sue your former employer for breach of contract / account stated.  Your damages (monetary compensation you are seeking in your lawsuit) are the amount you are owed.  You may be able to file your lawsuit in small claims court.  Upon prevailing in the case, you can also recover court costs which include the court filing fee and process server fee.


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