What to do if the administrator of an estate served me with paperwork for permission to sell or auction the only remaining property?

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What to do if the administrator of an estate served me with paperwork for permission to sell or auction the only remaining property?

I want to purchase one of the properties. I only have 20 days to respond or I am otherwise “barred from asserting future claims to the estate”. How do I respond? There are 4 heirs, the administrator, and 3 children. I am the only child that is not hers. All of the other assets have been sold. She took 50% of everything and put the rest in trust to be divided among children. However also used the trust to make improvements to property and to pay for the funeral (there was a policy that covered this expense. She has used almost every lawyer in area and I am in college with no income. What should I do?

Asked on March 4, 2013 under Estate Planning, West Virginia

Answers:

Catherine Blackburn / Blackburn Law Firm

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

I do not practice in West Virginia and cannot tell you what the court procedures are in that state.  However, I suggest you write a letter to the court immediately saying that you object to selling the property this way and ask for a hearing.  Then, go to the hearing and tell the court what you want.  If you cannot afford a lawyer, this is the best you can do.  Courts often help people who cannot afford a lawyer.


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