What to do about a severance package option related to relocation?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What to do about a severance package option related to relocation?

I have been working in the US on an L1 visa. Now returning to my home country for personal reasons after several years. Employer will not accomodate remote working solution long-term although there are similar cases where they do. So I expect that I will be let go eventually but they already indicated that I would not qualify for a severance package since I move on my own will. I already had huge expenses to move family and household goods back to my home country and I have also been with the company for 10+ years total. Should I have any reasonable hope to be able to negotiate something?

Asked on June 20, 2012 under Employment Labor Law, Texas

Answers:

B.H.F., Member, Texas State Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Everything really depends on your employer.  Texas is an at-will employment state which means that either the employee or the employer can end the employment relationship, at any time, for any reason.  At the end of the relationship, the employer is only required to pay the employee the wages they have already earned or whatever else was contractually agreed to when the employment relationship was created.  If you don't have a contract or some written agreement that they are required to help you with relocation, then it's up to them if they want to or not.  In the last few years, many employers have become much less generous because of budget cuts.  You can try to negotiate --- but it's not something that likely come voluntarily.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption