What to do if my husband and I purchased a home last year and all the listings stated there was a legal in-law quarters?

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What to do if my husband and I purchased a home last year and all the listings stated there was a legal in-law quarters?

We just received a letter stating we will need to update our water meter with a cost of $7500 because we added plumbing when in fact we did not. They are claiming that we added plumbing in the in-law quarters and they were not aware of it. However, it has been on this property, as far as we can tell, and in the paperwork for the last 19 years. Are we responsible to pay this or do we have a case?

Asked on June 25, 2012 under Real Estate Law, California

Answers:

Cameron Norris, Esq. / Law Office of Gary W. Norris

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

I am not sure if this demand is coming from the water company, the city or the county, but $7500 sounds awfully absurd. 

Since 1992, California State law has required water meter installation as part of all new construction. In 2004, the Legislature passed AB 2572, requiring all water suppliers to install water meters on all customer connections by January 1, 2025.


Now, as a part of the construction of the "granny-flat," the city should have granted permits including ones for a water connection, but it may be that permits were granted before the water meter requirement came into place in 1992.

I would ask whomever is making the demand what type of meter is required, what permits are required if any, and that you be able to get your own licensed contractor to do the work...because I imagine you can do better than $7500.

Best of luck.


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