If I am on the lease and my housemate changes the locks and refuses to comply with my retrieval of my belongings how can I get the landlord to let me in?

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If I am on the lease and my housemate changes the locks and refuses to comply with my retrieval of my belongings how can I get the landlord to let me in?

I am on the lease at my residence, but have given my formal notice that I will be vacating the premises by the end of the month. My housemate, who tried to violently attacked me 2 weeks ago, has changed the locks. I did not return for a week because of the attack, so I am not sure when she changed the locks. I spoke with the landlord and he has not agreed to comply with letting me into the house to retrieve my belongings. I want to go about this in the most professional and clean way, so I contacted the landlord first. Is there anything the police can do?

Asked on December 15, 2011 under Real Estate Law, Washington

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Most likely if you called the police about your rental situation they will not want to get involved claiming it is a civil issue. The problem that I see is that if your landlord had agreed to not let you in the rental to retrieve your belongings he is part of a wrongful course of conduct with your housemate.

I would call your landlord to set a date to allow you access to the rental so that you can retrieve your belongings. Follow up the call with a letter confirming what was discussed, keeping a copy for future need. If he refuses to allow you access to retrieve your belongings, you will need to consult with a landlord tenant attorney regarding how you need to proceed.


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