What to do if I work for a dentist who is writing prescriptions for narcotics to employees and having them fill them and then give them to him?

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What to do if I work for a dentist who is writing prescriptions for narcotics to employees and having them fill them and then give them to him?

He says it’s to send out of the country for doctors that don’t have access to medicines. He asked me to do it and I felt so pressured to do it, that I said ok. He called the prescription in, but I haven’t picked it up yet nor do I want to. I am moving out of the state in 2 months, but until then I need to keep my job. I want to turn him in but I am scared of the repercussions it might have on me.

Asked on March 10, 2013 under Malpractice Law, Utah

Answers:

Catherine Blackburn / Blackburn Law Firm

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

This is not a medical malpractice question.  It is a criminal law question.  What the dentist is doing violates several state and federal laws, and you know it. 

Unfortunately, many of us human beings are placed in circumstances of knowing something criminal is going on.  We either speak up or we don't.  There are consequences for each choice, but almost never can we "have our cake and eat it too."    If you feel strongly enough about this, report it to the police, the dental board, or the DEA and accept the consequences.  If you feel more strongly about keeping your job, then keep quiet and stop torturing yourself.  This really is your choice.


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