If I have a warrant in another state for trespassing and property damage under $1000, could I hire a lawyer there and have them appear on my behalf?

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If I have a warrant in another state for trespassing and property damage under $1000, could I hire a lawyer there and have them appear on my behalf?

Asked on December 13, 2012 under Criminal Law, Wyoming

Answers:

David West / West & Corvelli

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

The answer is probably yes.  If you have a warrant in another state, you absolutely can hire another lawyer there to handle it for you - which you should do.  If these charges are misdemeanors, which it sounds like they are, the lawyer may be able to convince a judge and prosecutor to allow you to resolve that case without returning to that state by a process called a plea in absentia.  This lets you enter a plea and agree to a punishment without ever stepping foot in court.  However, it does result in a conviction on the charges in most cases.

If the attorney cannot get this result for you, they may at least be able to get the judge and prosecutor to agree to rescind any bench warrant you have out in exchange for you appearing in court with them.  You then go to court with your lawyer, get the warrant lifted, and then resolve your case in the manner you see fit. 

Our office routinely assists clients with these issues and in the hands of a good criminal defense lawyer, there is a good chance this can be resolved favorably for you.

Best Regards,

David West

Attorney at Law

David West / David West & Associates

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

The answer is probably yes.  If you have a warrant in another state, you absolutely can hire another lawyer there to handle it for you - which you should do.  If these charges are misdemeanors, which it sounds like they are, the lawyer may be able to convince a judge and prosecutor to allow you to resolve that case without returning to that state by a process called a plea in absentia.  This lets you enter a plea and agree to a punishment without ever stepping foot in court.  However, it does result in a conviction on the charges in most cases.

If the attorney cannot get this result for you, they may at least be able to get the judge and prosecutor to agree to rescind any bench warrant you have out in exchange for you appearing in court with them.  You then go to court with your lawyer, get the warrant lifted, and then resolve your case in the manner you see fit. 

Our office routinely assists clients with these issues and in the hands of a good criminal defense lawyer, there is a good chance this can be resolved favorably for you.

Best Regards,

David West

Attorney at Law


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