How much can I ask for if I was hurt in a bus accident?

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How much can I ask for if I was hurt in a bus accident?

The suspension broke on a bus (not a city bus; I was taking a trip). I got hurt in the process. I sent a complaint but no answer. 3 months later I called a lawyer and he told me to send a demand letter to them. So I did and that’s when they got back to me. I missed days of work, got sick, and had to go to the hospital. They are now asking me how much am I asking for them to pay me. How much am I entitled to? Should I speak with a persona injury attorney? In Albany, NY.

Asked on April 4, 2011 under Personal Injury, New York

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

As a general rule, if you were hurt due to another's fault (e.g. negligence or carelessness, such a failure to do proper maintence), you can recover:

1) Actual out-of-pocket medical costs (what's not paid by insurance); including prescriptions and assistive devices, like canes, crutches, etc.

2) Lost wages--what you did not earn

3) Other out of pocket costs (e.g. did you  have to take cabs because you couldn't drive?)

4) For a serious enough injury, you can also seek pain and suffering--usually equal to 1 - 3 times medical costs; as a rough rule of thumb, assume that unless you add a few thousand dollars of medical, or some significant or long lasting impairment or disability or disfigurement, you may not be able to get pain and suffering

That's a rough ballpark or framework, though every case is different. If the above totals to a few thousand dollars, it's probably worth bringing a lawyer in on it; if it totals to under $1,000, you probably should continue to seek it on your own.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

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