How do I get out of a lease with bad roomamtes who are not following the rental aggreement?

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How do I get out of a lease with bad roomamtes who are not following the rental aggreement?

I currently on a year lease with 2 roommates We all pay our bills but they are raging alcoholics who fight constantly and throw things. They brought in a dog that was not approved by the leasing company. The house stays trashed even if I clean; I come home to a minimum of a case of beer bottles and dishes and fast food wrappers all over. What to do? I want to move; I need out of the lease.

Asked on April 5, 2012 under Real Estate Law, Alabama

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Unfortunately, nothing you have described seems to give you the right to get out of the lease. At the risk of oversimplying somewhat, a tenant may only get out of the lease if the landlord either breaches its terms in a material, or signficant way, or the landlord does not or cannot provide the rental premises in a fashion or state which is fit for inhabitation--that is, a tenant can only get out of the rent if the landlord does something wrong or can't live up to his or her obligations. A tenant may not get out of the lease due to the actions of his or her co-tenants. Furthermore, to be let out of the lease voluntarily (i.e. by the agreement or consent of the other parties), you would need all parties to the lease--not just the landlord, but also your co-tenants--to agree to let you out, which is unlikely.


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