What to do if I live with a roommate and I have 6 months left on the lease but want to move out?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What to do if I live with a roommate and I have 6 months left on the lease but want to move out?

It is very difficult to live with her I spoke to the leasing office and trying to get out of the apartment. They stated that I had 2 options: break the lease or have her sign me off the lease. If she fails to do either, can she take me to court? Also, if she does sign to take me off the lease, can she still take me to court? Do I have any other options?

Asked on October 10, 2012 under Real Estate Law, Colorado

Answers:

B.H.F., Member, Texas State Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Unless your lease agreement or contract with the leasing office has a different remedy, then you really are stuck with the two options that they have laid out to you:  have her sign you off or break the lease.  The lease is a contract between you and the leasing office.... not you and her.  So, the only person that would have a right to sue you at any point would be the leasing office.  The exception to this answer would be unless the lease agreement provides otherwise-- but most lease agreement bind the parties jointly and don't vest the right to sue in the other tenant.

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

What you really need is for your roommate and the landlord for the unit you have to remove you from liabilitity the lease that you are obligated for another six (6) months by way of a written document dated and signed by both.

If that does not happen, then your legal recourse is to break the lease and pay your share of the rental while you are not there, stick out the remaining time, or sub-lease your time left on the unit to a third party who essentially pays you as the landlord for rent and you pay the landlord your contractual obligation.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption