What to do about problems that I’m having with a former employer?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What to do about problems that I’m having with a former employer?

I am having several issues with a previous employer. First off I was terminated from the company 2 moths ago. I have on several occasions, requested documentation for mileage that is owed to me as well as my employee file. I was told several weeks ago that my pervious work e-mail account had been deleted and they were “trying to get the information”. Also, after requesting my employee file I was told I would have to pay the company a per page rate prior to recieving my employee file. Finally, I have recently been offered a possition with another company pending reference checks which my previous employer has not repsonded to despite multiple attempts. Is there anything that I can do about this to speed the process along?

Asked on September 28, 2012 under Employment Labor Law, Michigan

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Unfortunately, there is most likely nothing you can do:

1) An employer is not required to provide your employeee file or any other documentation (e.g. about mileage) to you--unless that is, you actually sue the employer, claiming, for example, that they did not reimburse you for costs they were supposed to. If you sue, you can use the legal mechanisms of "discovery" to seek this information--but given the cost and effort involved in litigation, this is not likely to be worthwhile.

2) If an employer chooses to allow you a copy of the employee file, they may charge you for making the copy.

3) An employer is never required to verify employment or cooperrate with reference checks.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption