Does an employer have to provide documentation when firing an employee?

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Does an employer have to provide documentation when firing an employee?

I was let go from a job. Half way through the day they told me to collect my possessions and proceed to my bosses office. He then stated we will be separating at this time. He took my badge and escorted me off the premises. When I asked why I’m being terminated he stated my attendance was in violation of their attendance policies. I never signed any termination paper, was never told when to expect my last paycheck and can’t contact anyone to figure this out because all phone numbers/email addresses are internal company use only. Without a badge I cannot go and ask? It gets more complicated because I did miss a day of work. My boss said I’ll hear from HR with my consequences in 2 days time. He also said that if I provide a docs excuse id be in the clear and all set. I specifically asked my boss if I should begin looking for a new job since it’s the holiday season and I can’t afford unemployment right now. He again stated

Asked on December 15, 2016 under Employment Labor Law, Florida

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

Unless your treatment constituted some form of legally actionable discrimination (which you did not specify) or it violated the terms of an employment contract or union agreement, it is legal. The fact is that most employment is "at will". This means that a company can set the conditions of employment much as it sees fit. This includes when and why to fire a worker. In fact, an employee can be terminated for any reason or no reason at all, with or without notice.


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