Can I sue the federal government or my union, after the contract dispute is settled by an arbitrator?

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Can I sue the federal government or my union, after the contract dispute is settled by an arbitrator?

I am a federal employee with 30 years experience. Three younger and new employees transferred from slower amd lower pay facility 3 years ago. After we trained them, they have been given pay raises $20K over us. This happened nationwide because of an agreement between U.S. government and our union. Union President told me it is wrong and they corrected it but cannot fix the error because arbitraitor settled dispute. I’m not buying it. Can I sue federal government or union for unfair labor practice or preferrential treatment etc. This mistake effects about 14,000 federal employees.

Asked on July 28, 2012 under Employment Labor Law, Hawaii

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

It is possible that you can sue the federal government and your union after the contract dispute is settled where several employees received higher pay raises than you and others. The problem I see is how were you actually damaged? You are getting your pay but not the pay that you want.

You have written nothing about being discriminated against based upon ethnicity, gender and the like which would be a violation of federal and state law. I suggest that you may want to discuss the matter further with an attorney that practices in the area of employment law.


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