Can I get my money back on a car I financed from an in house car lot, if less than an hour I pulled off the lot the check engine light came on?

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Can I get my money back on a car I financed from an in house car lot, if less than an hour I pulled off the lot the check engine light came on?

Asked on May 30, 2012 under General Practice, Texas

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

You need to check to see if the company is licensed to finance in house. If so, check your paperwork to see if this vehicle was purchased "as is" or with warranty. If not purchsed and as is, you may still have a right but be prepared to file a consumer complaint with the agency who handles consumer protection issues in your state. Only then would you be able to handle the issue of possible unfair and deceptive activity.

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Unless you can demonstrate that the seller of the vehicle that you purchased "concealed" known material facts concerning the car that you purchased that were material to the price paid or desirabilty of the vehicle that you have and did not disclose this to you before the sale, then the "check engine" light in and of itself does not give you a legal basis to cancel the purchase of the car that you have written about.

Many times "check engine" lights are activated due to some electronic glitch with a vehicle and need to be re-calibrated.


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