Can a resident of one state get legal aid for a case in another state?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Can a resident of one state get legal aid for a case in another state?

My boyfriend has gone through marriage dissolution finalization in 6 months ago. His now ex-wife is opening a case against him (in his previous place of residency; she and his 2 dependents still live there) to contest/dispute the ruling of zeroing out his rears payments and shared debt. He had a lawyer for the divorce because he wasn’t able to appear and needed representation. He is now relocated and is a working resident here. His former lawyer is no longer in his budget after his child support and minimal bills.

Asked on October 25, 2011 under Family Law, Florida

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

There is no guaranty of a lawyer in a civil case, including matrimonial, divorce, etc. cases. That means that if he can't afford a lawyer, one does not need to be appointed for him. Only in criminal cases is an attorney guaranteed.

There are some free legal resources for those who cannot afford an attorney in civil cases, but their standards are strict (it can't merely be that affording an attorney would be difficult; the litigant must be unable to afford one) and the demand for their services outstripes their resources, so only around 1/3 (or so) of applicants can get this assistance. He can try contacting Legal Services; he can also contact the state and county bar associations where he lives, who may be able to refer an attorney who will do the work pro bono (for free)--many lawyers and law firms will do some pro bono work each year.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption