Will I serve time in jail?

Saturday night me and my roommate in college got into a fight and he kicked me out of his car and called the cops on me. As I was
walking home I got arrested for minor in possession, public drunkenness, and disorderly conduct. I’m asking if I will have to serve any
jail time since this is my first offense and I’ve never got into any legal trouble before.

Asked on February 25, 2016 under Criminal Law, Alaska

Answers:

B.H.F., Member, Texas State Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

If the charges stick, you are looking at a probation or something less....mainly because these are not huge offenses and you are a first time offender.  A probation is where you do community service, pay a fine, and report to a probation officer.  It's inconvenient... but at least it's not jail time.
However, before you plea, make sure that you visit with a couple of local attorneys to review the facts of your case and other sentencing options.  Some of the facts of your case may rely on the testimony of your roommate.  If he was intoxicated, then his testimony may not be credible.    You also want to inquire about any special programs offered in your jurisdiction.  Some courts now offer diversion programs for young, first time offenders.  Basically, you do some of the work associated with a regular probation, but once you are done, the prosecutor dismisses your charge rather than proceeding as a conviction. 
You really do want the best deal possible because you are in college.  If you are receiving scholarship or financial aid assistance, then some programs will disqualify you from future assistance if convicted.   So... before you plead to any charges, make sure you understand the effect that it will have on your college career and your future career goals.


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