What do I do when a university is not paying my fees as a vendor?

I run a musical group that performed at a university this past May 2018. We
had an agreement with the university that outlined our payments by the
university as vendors of a service. The university changed many times the forms
that they needed from the individuals in the group, and has as of January 3rd
2019 still not released the payments to us, despite insisting that the payments
have been submitted for processing. There was no deadline for payment in our
agreement. Is there any action I can take to force them to release the payments,
or even with interest?

Asked on January 3, 2019 under Employment Labor Law, New York

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

1) You can sue them for the money, for breach of contract, or violating the agreement to pay you for your performance. When there is no date for payment  set in the agreement, the law imputes that payment should be in a reasonable. time frame--generally, between net 30 and net 60 days. A 9 month delay is not reasonable, so they are in breach of their obligations.
2) You can't get interest for the delay unless the agreement specifically provided for it.


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