Suing a tattoo artist

I have a half finished tattoo that the tattoo artist is refusing to finish. He is stating that I missed appointments and he gave my appointment cards. This was my chance to finish the work. I never got reminder cards and the desk clerk said she would call before appointments so I didn’t need the cards. No one ever called me about appointments. When I made my appointments

originally I was with another person. She received cards from the desk girl for her appointments. She went to her appointments two separate times one

time he didn’t show up and she waited for nothing. Another time she showed up and he said all of hers, and my appointments are cancelled. Now I have a

half finished tattoo that I need to find a comparable artist who can re-do/finish it. It is a high quality tattoo not just anyone can take the task.

Asked on June 4, 2018 under Personal Injury, Utah

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

Yes, you can sue him based on both breach of contract (violating the agreement, whether written or oral, under which he agreed to tatoo you in exchange for you paying him) and also based in tort (unreasonable, unprofessional carelessness and/or an intentionally wrongful act, causing you some loss [e.g. cost to find somene else to finish] or life distress [e.g. mental pain and suffering due to an intentional refusal to complete the work). 

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

Yes, you can sue him based on both breach of contract (violating the agreement, whether written or oral, under which he agreed to tatoo you in exchange for you paying him) and also based in tort (unreasonable, unprofessional carelessness and/or an intentionally wrongful act, causing you some loss [e.g. cost to find somene else to finish] or life distress [e.g. mental pain and suffering due to an intentional refusal to complete the work). 


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