My mother and her ex boyfriend are joint tenants with right to survivorship on a house in Tamarac, Florida. They are both on the deed and mortgage

1-Can she legally change the locks without giving him a key? 2-Can she legally change the alarm code without giving him the new one? 3-Can his family come over unannounced and enter the home when she is home or not without her consent even if he gave his? 4-If she can to the above WHERE can I find this in black and white, in a specific law or statute so I can copy this for her(which she will most definitely need to show this to them)

Asked on June 8, 2009 under Real Estate Law, Florida

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

1. No.  He is an owner of the home -- so nope. It would be tantamount to conversion and he can get the police involved. Now, is he beating her -- then yes if she has a restraining order.

2. See my answer to #1 above.

3. It depends -- that is a family matter -- if she feels uncomfortale, she can address her concerns and not allow them in.

4. Uhh, it is called joint ownership: https://real-estate-law.freeadvice.com/real-estate-law/property_ownership_forms.htm

Also see the following:

Florida common law concerning conversion.

Sounds to me like it is time to address these two not getting along and possibly jumping the gun by not being married and owning a property together the way they did: i.e., how long have they known each other? Is this a recent issue or have they owned the property and been together for quite a while?


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