If I withdraw from my beauty school can they charge me the whole amount of tuition?

Hello, I am in beauty school and I absolutely hate it, I
go to a horrible privately owned school and there is
so much that is just not right here, the tuition is
14,000 I got about 5000 in grants that I don’t have
to pay back and the rest in loans, apparently if I
withdraw according to my teacher who I can’t trust
if I quit I will have to pay back my student loans,
9000 on top of having to pay the school the whole
14,000 Can they do that? I never read anything like
that in my contract

Asked on June 7, 2017 under Business Law, South Carolina

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

Yes, unless there was an early termination clause in the contract pursuant to which you are going to school which allows you out of the school without owing all the money, when you signed up, you obligated yourself for the full tuition. They cannot be double paid--to extent they have received the money from loans or other sources and do not need to repay it or return it, they cannot also get that money from you. But any amounts of the tuition which are not paid to them from other sources, you will be responsible for, and they could sue you for that money if you do not voluntarily pay it. (If they try to sue you for money they received from loans or other sources, you would raise "satisfaction" as a defense--that the debt was "satisfied" by being paid by others.)


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