How did it take 12 years for me to find out about a bench/arrest warrant?

I was locked up, on probation, in court ordered camp and also had more truancy fines in 1999. I was in courts numerous of times and I was being supervised by the courts then so how, 12 years later, did I get 2 warrants for truancy in 1998? Why didn’t my parole officer tell me in 1999 I had unpaid fines? I believe I took care of them just like all the others fines I took care of. It was part of camp and probation for me to pay my fines before I could complete. So I believe they messed up somehow and now I have to pay for it. What can I do besides pay for a lawyer which would total more then the fine.

Asked on July 16, 2010 under Criminal Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

I know that it is probably futile to ask but is there any way you can trace payment of the fines?  Probably not, correct?  You are smart to make that assessment of balancing paying the fines versus paying an attorney.  It is sometimes a "business" decision.  And unless you come up with some kind of proof then I would say pay them off now.  As for the warrant, generally warrants are not "actively" pursued but rather passively pursued.  Meaning that they are usually enforced as a result of other situations like when someone is pulled over for a traffic infraction.  Rarely do officers go out and hunt down those in your situation.  So now you have a decision to make nut I think that you already have.  Good luck in putting it all behind you once and for all.


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