Would cutting off all contact with my baby’s father, including his contact with the baby, negatively affect me chances of getting full custody?

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Would cutting off all contact with my baby’s father, including his contact with the baby, negatively affect me chances of getting full custody?

My baby’s father has been seeing the baby on some weekends and wants to see the baby all weekends. There is currently no court order and we have never been married. The father has been physically abusive in the past to me. He’s also gotten into my house, hacked into me email accounts, bank accounts. I talked to the police regarding the bank account hacking and house trespassing. Since there is no hard evidence no claims were filed. The officer said to cut off all contact with the dad including visiting baby. I’m hoping for sole custody and I am wondering if cutting him off will jeopardize this?

Asked on March 2, 2011 under Family Law, Colorado

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Yes, I think that it will if you do it without a court order.  Generally speaking, courts encourage contact with both parents married or not and they tend not to like it when you "self help" in any legal proceeding.  So they will not look kindly on our cutting him off unless you can do so with proof that seeing the Father will not be in the best interest of the child, which is the standard that is always used.  If he is abusive call the police and report it.  Have him arrested and then get a restraining order.  Then the court will see the kind of influence he will be.  I would strongly suggest that you get legal help with all of this.  Good luck to you.


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