Will I lose my unemployment if I take a permanent part-time and refuse a temporary full-time job or vice versa?

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Will I lose my unemployment if I take a permanent part-time and refuse a temporary full-time job or vice versa?

I interviewed for apermanent  part-time job and the same day my temp agency called and said they would be getting in jobs in a day or two. If I am offered the part-time job and refuse it for the temp full-time job will I lose my unemployment if the full time job does not materialize for some reason? If I take the part-time job, can I refuse the temp full-time job and keep my benefits?

Asked on April 28, 2011 under Employment Labor Law, Illinois

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

First of all, you are jumping the gun here, as they say.   You have not been offered ANY job at this point i time, correct?  Interviewing is no guarantee and the call from the temp agency is nothing more than gambling at this point in time - like taking bets on a horse race.  The general rule is that you can not refuse employment while on unemployment.  This statement is qualified in that a engineerwho is unemployed can probably refuse employment at McDonald's without fear of being denied unemployment benefits.  The job offered is not in his line of employment.  If you take the part time work then your benefits will be reduced by the amount you make.  The full time job is not permanent but rather a temp job and the likelihood is that it will end and you will go back to collecting unemployment, correct? Then it is really not "full time" in the true sense of the word. Then I would stick with the part time permanenet position until such time as the full time permanenet position comes along. But I would double check with the state unemployment department on the matter as well.  Good luck.


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