What is the true definition of

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What is the true definition of

I have been employed at a company for the past 4 months. My offer letter

was for a 1- ear agreement but in the language, there was a possibility for

termination if the employer feels that there is just cause. The company is

based out of CA, incorporated in DE and I live in MN. Nothing in the agreement states

Asked on June 28, 2018 under Employment Labor Law, Minnesota

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

There is no legal definition of "just cause." There are grounds for termination which are considered "for cause" for purposes of determining whether someone is eligible for unemployment benefits after termination, like insubordination, absenteeism, violation of company policy or manager instructions, criminal acts committed at or in the course of work, etc.; these suggest strongly that "just cause" is more than simply that your boss is disappointed in you, but do not definitively establish that a subjectively perceived lack of or deficient sales/prospecting skills would be "just cause," since the definition of "for cause" termination is intended for a different context (i.e. unemployment benefits). Similarly, the lack of a baseline or benchmarks to compare performance against strongly suggests that a perceived shortfall is not "just cause" but does not definitively mean that they could not--were you to sue for "breach of contract"--convince a court that they had "just cause." All we can say, given the lack of definition for this in the law as well as what you write, is that if you were to sue for the additional 8 months, you would have a reasonable chance of success: we cannot state 100% that they could not establish "just cause" as a defense, however.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption