What can I do about being followed at work by my assistant manager?

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What can I do about being followed at work by my assistant manager?

An assistant manager at my company, on my day off, followed a co-worker and myself and then went back and reported that we were seen together at a grocery store. When I returned to work the next day, the co-worker (also an assistant manager) and myself were called to the front office. The store manager asked us that if she pulled up security footage of the grocery store what would it show. Is there anything I can do about this? The fact that it was my day off, was folloed, and then asked to explain my actions doesn’t sit very well with me. Is there anything I or my friend can do?

Asked on May 17, 2012 under Employment Labor Law, Virginia

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Unfortunately, there probably is nothing which can be done for one instance of being followed at work, IF what you were doing (being seen with this co-worker) violated employer policy, such as a non-fraternization policy. Employers are not limited to only taking account of what employees do at work; if employees violate employer policies when they off-site or off-shift, employers may still take action against them. That right to take action creates a right to investigate.

If there is no employer interest at stake though, then this may have been an instance of stalking or harassing--that is, it may actually have been criminal--though if it's just the one instance, it probably has not risen to that level yet. If it continues, however, then you may wish to contact the police if you feel sufficiently harassed or threatened.


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