Was is likely to happen if I turn myself in for probation violation and failure to appear warrants from 2004?

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Was is likely to happen if I turn myself in for probation violation and failure to appear warrants from 2004?

When I was 19 I lived in a town I had some extended family from as it wasn’t working out with my father in FL where I was from. I was pretty much couch surfing while I was here and was arrested for domestic violence due to a mutual somewhat physical argument with a “girlfriend”. I was sentenced with probation, fines, counseling, and community service. After that I was charged with underage consumption as well. I never completed any tasks and went back to FL when got the offer from a family member. This was 6 years ago and I’m now back in OH with my family. Wondering what to do? Should I speak with a criminal law attorney? In Union County, OH.

Asked on April 27, 2011 under Criminal Law, Ohio

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You should absolutely consult with and meet with a criminal law attorney in the state in which you are living and hope that person also has a license in Florida or see if the lawyer thinks it is better to meet with a Florida attorney, where I assume the charges and convictions were from. You need to get this squared away, otherwise it is just a matter of time before something happens (even something innocently) and the warrants that are out for you are discovered. Your lawyer may be able to do some magic based on your responsibilities since those events, whether you work, if you are responsible, tied to your community, have a family and the like. If anything, it will show growth, maturity and remorse, which will hopefully help you in the long run with any sentencing imposed.


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