Was I unfairly treated by being placed on administrative leave because I deleted my collegues from my Facebook account?

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Was I unfairly treated by being placed on administrative leave because I deleted my collegues from my Facebook account?

I am a teacher at a Catholic school. I decided to delete my teacher colleagues from my “friends”Facebook list mainly because we have a few young teachers who talk about others behind their backs, so I decided to play it safe and delete everyone. A few of the younger teachers (one of whom is the principal’s daughter who teaches there also) have asked why, and my response was that I am keeping it private by only having family and close friends on my list. My principal called me in and said that I shouldn’t have done this and that it created drama among the faculty and placed me leave.

Asked on May 29, 2011 under Employment Labor Law, Missouri

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Basically, you have no rights here.  That is unless you have an employment/union contract or there is company policy to the contrary.In an "at will" employment relationship (and most are), an employer cannot only hire/fire employees as it wants (with or without reason), it can also increase/decrease salary/hours, promote/demote, and generally impose requirements as it sees fit.  In turn, an employee can choose to work for their employer or not.  The only exception would be if discrimination played a role in the situation (which based on the facts presented does not appear to be the case).   

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Basically, you have no rights here.  That is unless you have an employment/union contract or there is company policy to the contrary.In an "at will" employment relationship (and most are), an employer cannot only hire/fire employees as it wants (with or without reason), it can also increase/decrease salary/hours, promote/demote, and generally impose requirements as it sees fit.  In turn, an employee can choose to work for their employer or not.  The only exception would be if discrimination played a role in the situation (which based on the facts presented does not appear to be the case).   


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