Is unpaid training legal?

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Is unpaid training legal?

I am a health care provider and I just signed a contract with a company. The contract stated the effective date is July 1st and the agreement shall also not be effective unless and until employee has obtained her proper license and credentials to practice. Because not all of the insurance companies have credentialed me, I haven’t started working. However, I was scheduled to have a full 6 days training. When I asked, they told me that we won’t get paid for those hours because once they start they can’t stop paying us. Is it legal for them to do unpaid training before I even get started working?

Asked on July 28, 2011 Ohio

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

The agreement between your future employer and your control over issues of future payment. Most likely you will be on a probationary period of time once you start actual employment for pay.

If your future employer requires six days of actual training as a condition of starting your actual employment for pay where you are not paid for your time where you are at this training session, it can. Your option is to either accept the fact that the training session you must attend is not going to be paid as salary to you or refuse to attend and not get the job.

Given the economic conditions of this country, you should consider your options with and without a job and the small loss in potential income for the six days of unpaid training versus and income stream.

Good luck.


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