Summoned to defend myself in chancery court over property in my name that i filed bankruptcy on 11 years ago

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Summoned to defend myself in chancery court over property in my name that i filed bankruptcy on 11 years ago

I was summoned to defend my self in chancery
court, it says if i fail to defend myself
judgement by default can be rendered, they are
asking for a petetion to quiet ttle, from what
i get that they are wanting the court to make
them the rightful owners, i filed bankruptcy on
this property 11 years ago, it has had 3 owners
since then, how is my name still involved and
do i need to go to court with a lawyer, just
let the judgement go without showing up, i have
no plans to fight it,

Asked on November 14, 2018 under Real Estate Law, Tennessee

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

If they are not suing you for money but only to quiet title and you have no interest in this property (in any sense: i.e. no legal interest in it and no desire try to fight for it somehow), then the best way to handle it is to show up to court without a lawyer and simply explain on the record what you explained here, in some more detail. Make it clear that you are not opposing AND that you have not been an owner of the property for years (and so you don't even know why you are there). The judge can issue the necessary order for title since you are not opposing, but can do so in a way that makes it clear you had no interest in and no liabilty for the property. Bring any relevant documentation regarding yoru bankruptcy and when you transferred or lost title.


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