If I sent in a laptop for repair under warranty but the repair shop damaged the laptop twice, can I sue?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

If I sent in a laptop for repair under warranty but the repair shop damaged the laptop twice, can I sue?

The first time they damaged it, they damaged it to the point that there was sharp plastic sticking out that actually gave me a minor cut. They repaired that after arguing for a couple days. I got it back and it’s got a new problem. The case they put on it was broken and there is an emblem sticking half way off. They want me to send it back again for them to fix it. I’ve been without my laptop for two weeks fixing their mistakes and they want it again. Can I just sue them for repair fees or the cost of the computer and for the time without my laptop from their mistake? Also, for the cut?

Asked on June 27, 2012 under General Practice, Nevada

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

If the laptop that you have has been sent twice to the repair shop that ended up damaging the item, you can sue the repair shop for the costs of the repair if it will not unilaterlly fix your laptop on its own. The damages would be the costs of repairing the item by a third person.

You can sue the repair company for the down time of your computer caused by it damaging it and prevail IF you can demonstrate with reasonable certainty in terms of dollars and cents your damages by way of receipts, the rental of another laptop and the like.

As for as getting compensation for the cut, unless you received mediacl attention for it and paid a doctor's bill for treatment, you are out of luck to receive any monetary compensation for that item of claimed damages.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption