What can an unlicensed contractor do regarding a client’s refusal of payment?

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What can an unlicensed contractor do regarding a client’s refusal of payment?

My husband remodeled an office for a business. The work was high quality and done in a timely manner. During the remodel he uncovered some bad wiring throughout the building and an electrician had to be called in. This was not my husbands decision and was keptonly between the business and the electrician. The remodel was finished and my husband went to collect payment, however, the owner refused him payment saying the cost of the electrician came out of his labor. What do we do? Can we fight this?

Asked on December 20, 2011 under Bankruptcy Law, Michigan

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Under the laws of most if not all states in this country (California for example), an unlicensed contractor is precluded as a matter for law for suing for unpaid labor and material provided to a customer. The rationale is that a license is required to protect the general public from unlicensed contractors who do not have the required training, knowledge and experienced compared to a licensed contractor.

This may be the law in your state. If so, I suggest that your husband discount his fee and get as much as he can for payment. I suggest that he consult with an attorney who practices construction law in your state of residence.


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