What can happen if I left the scene of an accident?

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What can happen if I left the scene of an accident?

Last saturday morning I was in an accident wth my truck; there was no other vehicle involved and I wasn’t injured but I did hit a telephone pole. I had to work and couldn’t delay it cause I can’t afford to miss any time. I’ve been working out of town for the last few days and figured I’d just get the truck towed when I got back and had the money to do so (it was out of town and my truck isn’t worth more than a grand). It has been towed and I have not been contacted about anything. I was wondering what I should do and what I can be charged with?

Asked on September 4, 2013 under Accident Law, North Carolina

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 7 years ago | Contributor

And let me clarify: you left the car at the scene as well?  Leaving the scene of an accident is a crime in North Carolina. They are known as "hit and runs." Most hit and runs/leaving the scene of an accident cases in North Carolina are filed as misdemeanors. However, in serious cases where victims are severely injured and in need of medical assistance, or there was a great amount of property damage, the individual who fled the scene faces a felony and substantial jail time. Did you damage the telephone pole?  That could count.  Also you could be ticketed under cdivil ordinances for abandoning the vehicle.  I would call the police or state police about the car and where it was towed and speak with an attorney.  Good luck.


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