Must you serve probation following parole or does completion of parole mean you served your sentence?

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Must you serve probation following parole or does completion of parole mean you served your sentence?

For a felony conviction, my husband was sentenced to 13 years incarceration to be followed by 1 year of probation with GPS monitoring. He was released after 5 years in prison and DOC gave him 2 years parole which are almost completed. He has been compliant with all the conditions of parole, which did not include GPS monitoring. For all intents and purposes he has been a “free man” while on parole, just checking in with the PO every couple months. Will he still need to complete the year of probation with GPS monitoring, which seems like a step backward?

Asked on October 18, 2011 under Criminal Law, Indiana

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

In order to answer your question, one needs to carefully read the terms and conditions of the probation and parole of your husband in that these two documents set forth the requirements that he must adhere to as the conditions of his release from jail.

Since he was paroled from jail early from what his sentence was, an argument could be made that his probation and parole requirements run consecutively (at the same time) and that he is no longer on probation.

Perhaps he could contact his parole officer about further details regarding his probation? Good question.


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