Can a credit union repo a car without notice and force you to pay it off in full and other pass due accounts before they return the car?

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Can a credit union repo a car without notice and force you to pay it off in full and other pass due accounts before they return the car?

Due to job loss, I made partial payments on my vehicle loan and the credit union did not offer hardship help. My remaining balance was $2300, but when my payment s got 3 mos behind, they repo’d my car without warning. Now they want me to pay the vehicle off in full, plus $375 storage. They added more fees because I am behind on my credits card and another loan payment. They want me to pay $3,300 to get my car back, and will not give me a written breakdown of the amount they are asking. They also said they will not give me the title until all the other loans are paid off. Is this legal?

Asked on February 25, 2012 under Bankruptcy Law, Texas

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

The best way for you to get an answer to your question is to carefully read the loan that you received for the vehicle from the credit union. The paperwork will set forth what the credit union can do and cannot do with respect to notice given to you or not. From my experience in such matters, the credit union can repossess your vehicle without notice due to your delinquency and could very well require the loan be paid off in full before the car is returned to you.


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