if spouse do not work

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

if spouse do not work

how much is she intitled too?

Asked on May 11, 2018 under Family Law, Georgia

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

You don't give much by way of details. However, judges rarely force a stay-at-home spouse to find employment while a divorce is still pending. Generally, a couple’s financial status quo is maintained during this time. Accordingly, the earning spouse must continue paying the mortgage and other bills belonging to the “marital estate". If a spouse doesn't have a job, the court will most typically order temporary or “pendente lite” spousal support during this period, so that the non-working spouse can purchase groceries and take care of their necessary personal expenses. However, financial support from an ex-spouse after a divorce is not a right, generally it depends on why the spouse is unemployed. If they have never worked and have no job skills, the court is more likely to order spousal support. If such a spouse is relatively young, a judge might order temporary support or "rehabilitative" alimony to extend a few years after the divorce so as to provide the spouse with an income long enough to allow them to go back to school or otherwise obtain employable skills. If they do have job skills but haven’t used them because the other spouse's income was enough so that do they you didn’t have to work, temorary support provides them with an income until they can find a job in their field. Typically, long-term or permanent alimony/spousal support is reserved for older spouses following a marriages of 10 or more years. It generally lasts until they remarry or the paying spouse dies. 


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption