What to do if I overcharged or illegally charged for “damages” and not notified but the co-signer was billed?

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What to do if I overcharged or illegally charged for “damages” and not notified but the co-signer was billed?

I was a first-time renter with my roommate and my grandfather the co-signer. We recently ended our 1 year lease agreement (last month) and I conducted the walk-through evaluation of our apartment. Other than carpet tearing at one door’s seam and a quarter inch hole in one window screen, there was no physical damage to the apartment. I awaited notification from the apartment but received no call, however my grandfather received a bill for $500 in “damages” (a total surpassing our already $300 security deposit) listed as $500 for “carpet replacement,” $100 for “new paint” $200 for “general cleaning.”

Asked on June 20, 2012 under Real Estate Law, Oregon

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

If you disagree with the assessed charges that the landord sent the co-signer of your lease after move out, I would write the former landlord asking for all back up information for such charges such as photographs and receipts.

If you receive such documentation, pay what you deem is warranted and contest the balance. Note, unless your presumed written lease says otherwise, "new paint" and "general cleaning" are costs normally incurred by the landlord as the cost of renting.


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