What to do if I want to sue my sister for getting me fired on a new job and damaging my reputation for future jobs?

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What to do if I want to sue my sister for getting me fired on a new job and damaging my reputation for future jobs?

I recently started the job of my dreams. The owner of the company is high profile and prominent. As in all jobs, I had a 90 day probation period. One month into my position, my sister and I had a big fight. She threatened to call the vice president, owners, controller and my associates and make a stink. Well she did just that. She called everyone in my company and spoke of our personal struggles. She herself is a VP. Her intent was to get me fired A week later I was. Devasting. Now my reputation is damaged because of it.

Asked on December 27, 2011 under Personal Injury, Florida

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

If your sister made untrue factual allegations about you which damaged your reputation and made others not want to work with you--for example, she falsely claimed you had committed a crime, were an alcohalic, were a sex offender, etc.--then you may be able to sue her for defamation and recover compensation.

However, if she "merely" told the truth, even if unflattering, and/or expressed opinions about you, then you would not have a cause of action--while what she did was morally wrong, it was not legally wrong. People are allowed to express their opinions and tell the truth, even if their intentions are hurtful.

If she lied about herself--for example, falsely identifying hereself as the VP of some company this other firm did business with--it is *possible* that you may be able to sustain a claim for tortiuous interference with economic advantage, on the ground that she lied about her identity (something which is wrongful in many contexts) to damage you economically. Howver, usually, this takes more than just lying about your own position or role; you could try discussing this cause of action and the situation in detail with an attorney, but it is probably a long shot.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

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