If I have just moved into an apartment complex, can I break the lease?

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If I have just moved into an apartment complex, can I break the lease?

It started with not having my apartment ready at the move in date. I picked up my keys that day but there was still a painter in there painting, there were doors that would not lock, and the washer and dryer were still in there from the previous renter. The washer and dryer were not removed until 5 days later and the door was not fixed until 6 days later. I did an inventory report of the apartment and turned it in to the front office. I told them I had to cancel my movers because of the apartment not being habitabal. When I moved in I began to notice the apartment had some bugs. I have been there a week now and can confidentally say this apartment is infested with roaches. They are coming out to spray, but the roach smell in the apartment is beginning to make me sick. I tried to contact the property manager multiple times, but received no response. I only get responses from the leasing agents. I had to call corporate multiple times just to send an email. Is there any way out?

Asked on October 23, 2012 under Real Estate Law, Texas

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

From what you have written about your new rental does not in and of itself lend the situation for you to terminate the lease without recourse to you landlord for the balance of rent owed under the agreement.

The only exception is if you have the health department inspect the unit where the unit is deemed not habitable per code. If that happens then you might be in a position to end your lease without recourse.


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