What to do if I have a gift card for a spa that is going out of business?

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What to do if I have a gift card for a spa that is going out of business?

They said that because they are closing they are booked and can no longer take appointments for the gift cards; they also will not refund my money. They are scheduled to close on Saturday but have not opened this week. There are several of us holding these cards. Is there any way to get our money back? Can I file in small claims or possibly start a class action lawsuit? There are a lot of us who have these. My daughter and I both have $70 gift cards. Several others have come to me due to a post I put on the spa’s website and said they too would like to get their money back. Is there anything that we can do? They have basically locked their doors already.

Asked on June 19, 2015 under General Practice, Massachusetts

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 6 years ago | Contributor

Yes you can filein small claims court to try and recoup your money, however it may cost you more in filing expenses that you will be awarded. 

How did you pay for the cards? If it was with a credit card, you contact the bank that issued the credit card you paid with and have it put the amount in dispute and request a charge-back. Also, if the business is part of a chain, you can try your gift card at another of its stores. If not, you cab try to contact the only directly and try to work something out.

In the meantime, report your complaint to consumer agencies that investigate business practices such as your state's attorney general’s office or office consumer affairs and/or and the Better Business Bureau.


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