Can I voida contract for a car purchase if I was not given an odometer disclosure?

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Can I voida contract for a car purchase if I was not given an odometer disclosure?

Recently purchased a vehicle in which I was so dissatisfied with after a few days that I immediately traded it in for a different vehicle, losing a lot of money in the process, and being forced to buy a $25,000 car, for closer to $40,000. They failed to obtain a odometer disclosure at the first purchase. Can I use this to void that first contract, if not, to at least soften the blow a little? I only drove the first vehicle home.

Asked on June 28, 2011 under General Practice, Washington

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Whether or not you can cancel the purchase contract for the car that you purchased due to the failure of not being given an odometer disclosure by the seller varies depending upon the statutes of each State in this country.

Most likely just because you were not given he odometer disclosure when you purchased the car by the seller will not allow you to void the car's purchase. You might mention the seller's failure to provide this document as a means to negotiate further on the ultimate amount you will be responsible for on the purchase.

Was there an actual problem with the car's odometer reading a higher mileage total than what it actually has? If there is, then you have a basis for trying to cancel the purchase.

Good luck.


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