How do Iwithdraw as a plaintiff in a lawsuit?

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How do Iwithdraw as a plaintiff in a lawsuit?

I am bein included in a court case 2 fight my father’s estate as 1 of the heirs. I don’t want nothing to do with any of it or them, how do i remove me

My father died in 11/09 of cancer. He had a Will since 1976 but a new one was drawn up 6 days before his death. He was on morphine and onset of dementia. Their are 4 children. The boys got left in, the girls, including me, were removed. One of my brothers lived with him an was very controlling. He had been a drug user and also had been in jail for 4 years. My sister hired a lawyer to fight the new Will. The estate valued around $400,000. Yes I need money but I just want to be left alone. I don’t want to be involved in any of this or them. How do or can I remove myself as one of the heirs?

Asked on October 18, 2010 under Estate Planning, Tennessee

Answers:

S.L,. Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You can file a request for dismissal with the court.  The court has the form.  You have to be very careful when completing the form so that other parties are not dismissed, and you are the only one who is dismissed.  You will need to serve the form on all other parties in the case.  You can serve them by mail with an attached proof of service.  A dismissal without prejudice means you can reinstate the case in the future.  A dismissal with prejudice means the case cannot be reinstated.  The request  for dismissal should be filed with the court with a proof of service attached.  If the court doesn't file it immediately, you will need to file it with a self addressed stamped envelope in order for it to be returned to you.  The court keeps one copy and you should include an extra copy to be returned to you.


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